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Tuesday, 29 September 2015

L stands for

Lewis Carroll.

Lewis Carroll Is the pen name of an Oxford Don and Anglican Deacon Charles Lutwidge Dodd, he wrote the legendary story  'The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland'

 It is, in my view, a fantasy story for children and adults alike.

  I read this in junior school and found it rather scary, but when good old Walt Disney turned it into an animated movie I got a better feeling about it and could see the writing for what it was.. a tale of fantasy. 

A window in Daresbury Parish Church depicted scenes from Alice in Wonderland. 

 Lewis Carroll was born in a small Cheshire village called Daresbury just 20 miles from my home.  His father was the Anglican Parish Priest there  when LC   was growing up. 

 Ken Dodd, a much loved comedian from Liverpool,  has recorded a series of readings from the story, they are held at the Lewis Carroll Centre in the village.

The Nave of the Parish Church All Saints with the Alice Window looking down upon the aisle.


 As the Alice in Wonderland tale is so long and complex, oozing with wonderful zany characters and wise and witty sayings, I've compiled a few extracts and images, from the book for you to enjoy.

 The main synopsis of the story is about Alice, a little girl, who on seeing a white rabbit with a stopwatch, out of curiosity, follows him. She  falls down a rabbit hole and enters a the world of wonderland.

The Cheshire Cat's Grin....Scary or what?


Alice on meeting The Cheshire Cat: "Well I've seen a cat without a grin", thought Alice "but a grin without a cat"! 

The Cheshire Cat appearing behind his smiling teeth!

 "It's the most curious thing I ever saw in my life".

 Alice asked the Cheshire Cat who was sitting in a tree,

 "What road do I take?"

Alice as she enters Wonderland.

 The Cat asked, "Where do you want to go?"

 "I  don't know" , Alice answered.

"Then",  said the Cat, it really doesn't matter does it"?



The Mad Hatter.




 Mad Hatter: "Would you like a little more tea"? Alice: "Well I haven't had any yet, so I can't very well take more".


 March Hare: Ah, you mean you can't very well take less.

 Mad Hatter: Yes ,  you can always take more than nothing. 

The Mad Hatter's Tea Party.


 Wise words.

 The rule is jam tomorrow and jam yesterday but never jam today. 

 (The White Queen)
Alice with The White Queen.

Well there it slant on a much loved and revered writer, with such an enlightening and humorous ideology

My sincere thanks to the laudable Denise for devising ABCW, thus enabling us all to linger awhile and look and learn of others lives. Thanks also to the lenient Roger for his loyalty to ABCW, working tirelessly to keep us all connected.

Lastly,  lets not forget the team of helpers who read and comment on every site that they possibly can,

Best wishes to all,
ABCW team helper.




  1. Indeed.. sometimes filmes (animated or not) can give an other understanding of a story...

    This one is a good example.

    Have a nice abc-week / day
    ♫ Mel☺dy ♫ (abc-w-team)

  2. Great church photos and thanks for the interesting post.
    I have the book as a reprint with old illustrations, that I like more than Disney's...
    Greetings from Germany

  3. An enjoyable read, Di. I remember the story and it scared me a bit, too. Even the movie. When a bit older and having knowledge of drugs, I thought she'd taken LSD!!!

    abcw team

  4. I always thought the Alice story was a bit weird and scary, even the Disney version.
    I agree with Leslie...maybe Alice was "tripping"

  5. A great choice. People complain about Disney, but sometimes the studio makes it easier to understand.


  6. I have to admit I am probably the only person in the world who has not read or seen the movie: "Alice In Wonderland". But you made it sound very interesting and fun today.

  7. You wrote very well about our timeless Alice. Thanx for sharing.

  8. I agree with Berowne, but then: you always write well!
    If you ever decide to come to Holland with your husband or other relative, you can stay with me. I have always had a lot of visitors from abroad.
    Thanks for the lovely post!
    Wil, ABCW Team

  9. A great detailed post for the letter L!

  10. We had a dubbed version of the cartoon picture on the television while growing up back in early nineties. It has a global presence I guess!

  11. Leslie: I have read that Lewis Carroll did use Laudanum which is an opiate.
    It is said that quite a few writers took it also. including Poe, Shelley, Keats, Coleridge, Byrom and many more. This could explain the fantasy theme in 'Alice'.
    In Charles Dickens's 'The Mystery of Edwin Drood', the sinister Uncle Jasper drank it.
    Victorian women took it for menstrual cramps and migraine, it is said that Queen Victoria was addicted to it, initially taking it for menstrual cramps then after the loss of her beloved Prince Albert used it as a comforter to help her with her grief.
    Di xx

  12. Berowne,
    Thank you for dropping by and your kind comments,
    such an accolade from our very own movie magnet.
    I shall be over to your site later to try to sort out your
    latest puzzle,

    Best wishes,
    ABCW team.

  13. Hello Wil,
    Thanks again for your kind comments. Literature and poetry
    is a passion of mine, but I'm sure you already know that.
    Thank you for your kind invitation for us to stay if we visit
    The Netherlands, really kind of you, xx

    Best wishes,

    ABCW team,

  14. Photowannabe:
    Thanks for stopping by and commenting.
    It was more likely that Lewis Carroll was 'tripping',
    not Alice, although she did 'trip' down a rabbit hole!

    best wishes,
    ABCW team.

  15. Nice joke .. and good to know about the personality ..


  16. I used to read a lot of science-fiction (50 years ago). Alice in Wonderland was not any stranger than that stuff.
    Enjoyed your post!

  17. Beautiful sketches. I really like them.

  18. A beautiful church, - nice to think of the 'Alice' window. I guess I always accepted Alice in Wonderfland for what it was, and didn't find it the least bit scary, - a weird kind of logic in spots...

  19. I never completely finished reading Alice. Was it scary? I don't know why.

  20. I heard somewhere that the characters were a parody on officials and important people of the time, but hidden in a children's tale. I remember not understanding lots of cartoons as a child because they were packed with adult humour. - Margy

  21. I was telling the Husband the other day that I want to read Alice in Wonderland. I have only read annotated and retold versions of it. My first introduction to the tale was the 1933 film in which W.C. Fields was Humpty Dumpty, Gary Cooper the knight, and I think Cary Grant as the Mock Turtle.

  22. I like how you use the alphabet letters and make a wonderful post out of them.
    Very creative! Fun to read.
    Happy ABCW!

  23. Hi Trubes.. I really enjoyed this post! My first introduction to Alice in Wonderland was a movie shown to all of the elementary grades in my little school (There were 300 kids in my school from grades 1-11, so there must have been at least 100 kids crammed into our small cafeteria). That would have been sometime between 1956 and 60, I'm guessing. It was a reel-to-reel movie and the tape kept breaking so it took a long time to watch it. I didn't love it at the time. Like you, I found it rather frightening. However, I remember the extracts you chose and think I really must read the book as an adult. Lewis Carroll is brilliant!

  24. Hello Diane ..I still find the whole "Alice in Wonderland" thing scary. As you know the author was a professor in Oxford We also have a Alice shop. Not very friendly though. Shame really. Take care Anne xo


I usually like to reply to your comments but for some reason when i do post a reply it just diappears, any advice would be most welcome,Thanks Di x

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